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  • Hunter 31 Sailboat

The Hunter 31 Sailboat Specs & Key Performance Indicators

The Hunter 31, a B&R rigged masthead sloop, was designed by Cortland Steck and built in the USA by Hunter Marine.

Hunter 31 sailboat

Published Specification for the Hunter 31

Underwater Profile:  Fin keel & spade rudder

Hull Material:  GRP (Fibreglass)

Length Overall:  31'4" (9.6m)

Waterline Length:  26'3" (8.0m)

Beam:  10'11" (3.4m)

Draft:  5'3" (1.6m)

Rig Type:  B&R

Displacement:  9,700lb (4,400kg)

Ballast:  4,000lb (1,814kg)

Designer:  Cortland Steck

Builder:  Hunter Marine (USA)

Year First Built:  1983

Year Last Built:  1987

Published Design Ratios for the Hunter 31

Sail Area/Displacement Ratio :  16.2

Ballast/Displacement Ratio:  41.2

Displacement/Length Ratio: 239

Comfort Ratio:  22.4

Capsize Screening Formula:   2.1

Read more about these  Key Performance Indicators...

Summary Analysis of the Design Ratios for the Hunter 31

eBook: How to Avoid Buying the Wrong Sailboat

1. A Sail Area/Displacement Ratio of 16.2 suggests that the Hunter 31 will, in the right conditions, approach her maximum hull speed readily and satisfy the sailing performance expectations of most cruising sailors.

2. A Ballast/Displacement Ratio of 41.2 means that the Hunter 31 will stand up well to her canvas in a blow, helping her to power through the waves.

3. A Displacement/Length Ratio of 239, tells us the Hunter 31 is a moderate displacement cruiser, which means she'll carry all your cruising gear without it having a dramatic effect on her performance. Most of today's sailboats intended for offshore cruising fall into this displacement category.

4. Ted Brewer's Comfort Ratio of 22.4 suggests that crew comfort of a Hunter 31 in a seaway is similar to what you would associate with the motion of a coastal cruiser with moderate stability, which is not the best of news for anyone prone to seasickness. 

5. The Capsize Screening Formula of 2.1 tells us that a Hunter 31 would not be as good a choice of sailboat for ocean passage-making, owing to the increased risk of capsize in strong winds and heavy seas when compared to a sailboat with a CSF of less than 2.0.

The Hunter 31 Sailboat: A Review

The Hunter 31 is a popular model from Hunter Marine, an American company that has been building quality sailboats since 1973. The Hunter 31 was first introduced in 1983 and was designed by Cortland Steck. It was produced until 1987, when it was replaced by the Hunter 33.5. In 2006, Hunter Marine launched a new version of the Hunter 31, which is sometimes referred to as the Hunter 31-2 or the Hunter 30/31. This boat was designed by Glenn Henderson and was in production until 2014. In this article, we will focus on the original Hunter 31, but we will also mention some of the differences and similarities with the newer model.

The Hunter 31 is a sloop-rigged cruiser that can accommodate up to six people in two cabins and a convertible salon. It has a fin keel, a spade rudder and a single wheel steering system. The boat has a self-tacking jib and an optional in-mast furling system for easy sail handling. The boat also has a Yanmar diesel engine with a low fuel capacity of 12 gallons.

The Hunter 31 is a boat that offers a lot of features and benefits for recreational sailors. Here are some of the main aspects of the boat that you might want to know more about:

Overview The Hunter 31 is a boat that combines performance, comfort and convenience. It is a boat that can sail well in light to moderate winds, thanks to its efficient hull shape and rig design. It is also a boat that can handle rougher conditions, thanks to its high stability and stiffness. The boat has a PHRF rating of 174, which means it is faster than some of its competitors in its size range.

The Hunter 31 is also a boat that offers plenty of space and amenities for living aboard. It has a beam of 10 feet and 11 inches, which gives it a roomy interior and a wide cockpit. It has two private cabins, one forward and one aft, each with a double berth and storage space. It has a large salon with a U-shaped dinette that can convert into another double berth, a navigation station with an electrical panel and instruments, and a galley with a two-burner stove, an oven, a sink, an icebox and ample counter space. It has a head with a marine toilet, a sink and a shower. It also has plenty of ventilation and natural light, thanks to its numerous ports, hatches and skylights.

The Hunter 31 is also a boat that is easy to operate and maintain. It has a simple and user-friendly layout, with all the controls and lines led back to the cockpit. It has an engine access panel under the companionway steps, which makes it easy to check and service the engine. It has a molded fiberglass hull and deck, which are durable and easy to clean.

Accommodation The Hunter 31 can sleep up to six people in two cabins and a convertible salon. The forward cabin has a V-shaped double berth with storage drawers underneath, shelves along the hull sides, an overhead hatch and two opening ports. The aft cabin has an athwartships double berth with storage lockers underneath, shelves along the hull sides, an opening port and an overhead hatch. The salon has a U-shaped dinette that can convert into another double berth with storage lockers underneath, shelves along the hull sides, four opening ports and two overhead hatches. The head is located on the port side of the salon, opposite the galley. It has a marine toilet with a holding tank, a sink with hot and cold water, a shower with a sump pump, storage cabinets, an opening port and an overhead hatch.

The accommodation layout of the newer Hunter 31-2 is slightly different from the original model. The forward cabin has more headroom and more storage space than the original model. The aft cabin has less headroom but more floor space than the original model. The salon has a straight settee on the starboard side instead of a navigation station, and a smaller dinette on the port side that can convert into a single berth. The head is located on the starboard side of the salon, opposite the galley. It has a separate shower stall with a folding door, which makes it more spacious and comfortable than the original model.

Hull and Deck The Hunter 31 has a solid fiberglass hull with a balsa core sandwich construction for the deck. The hull has a moderate displacement of 9,700 pounds and a ballast of 4,000 pounds. The hull has a fin keel with a draft of 5 feet and 3 inches, which gives it good performance and stability. The hull also has a spade rudder with a stainless steel shaft and bearings, which gives it good maneuverability and responsiveness. The deck of the Hunter 31 is designed for safety and convenience. It has a wide and flat foredeck with an anchor locker, an anchor roller and an electric windlass. It has stainless steel bow and stern pulpits, stanchions and lifelines. It has two dorade vents on the cabin top for ventilation. It has two large cockpit lockers for storage, one on each side of the wheel. It has a transom swim platform with a folding ladder and a shower. It also has a stern rail seat on each side of the cockpit, which provides extra seating and visibility.

The hull and deck of the newer Hunter 31-2 are similar to the original model, but with some improvements and modifications. The hull has a slightly longer waterline length of 28 feet, which increases its speed potential. The hull also has a shoal draft option of 3 feet and 11 inches, which makes it more suitable for shallow waters. The deck has a more modern and sleek appearance, with flush-mounted hatches, recessed handrails and an arch over the cockpit that supports the mainsheet traveler and the optional bimini top.

Mast and Rigging The Hunter 31 has a sloop rig with a deck-stepped mast and swept-back spreaders. The mast is made of anodized aluminum and has internal halyards and wiring. The mast height is 46 feet and 7 inches, which makes it suitable for most bridges and marinas. The mast also has an optional in-mast furling system for the mainsail, which makes it easier to reef and stow the sail.

The boat has a B&R rig, which is a fractional rig that eliminates the need for a backstay. This allows for a larger mainsail area and a smaller jib area, which improves the boat's performance in light winds and reduces its heeling tendency. The boat also has a self-tacking jib, which makes it easier to tack and trim the sail without changing sheets.

The boat has stainless steel standing rigging and low-stretch running rigging. The boat has two Lewmar self-tailing winches on the cabin top for halyards and reefing lines, and two Lewmar self-tailing winches on the coaming for jib sheets. The boat also has rope clutches, cam cleats, blocks, tracks and cars for adjusting the sails. The mast and rigging of the newer Hunter 31-2 are similar to the original model, but with some differences. The mast height is slightly lower at 46 feet, which reduces its windage and weight aloft. The mast also has an optional in-boom furling system for the mainsail, which gives it more sail shape control than the in-mast furling system. The boat also has an optional spinnaker or gennaker for downwind sailing.

Keel and Rudder The Hunter 31 has a fin keel which is bolted to the hull with stainless steel bolts and nuts. The keel draft is 5 feet and 3 inches, which gives it good performance upwind and downwind. The keel also provides stability and balance to the boat. The boat has a spade rudder with a stainless steel shaft and bearings. The rudder draft is 5 feet, which matches the keel draft. The rudder also provides maneuverability and control to the boat.

The keel and rudder of the newer Hunter 31-2 are similar to the original model, but with some options. The boat has a shoal draft option of 3 feet and 11 inches, which reduces its draft by more than one foot. The boat also has an optional wing keel or twin keels, which increase its stability at low speeds or when anchored.

The above text was drafted by sailboat-cruising.com using GPT-4 (OpenAI’s large-scale language-generation model) as a research assistant to develop source material; we believe it to be accurate to the best of our knowledge.

Other sailboats in the Hunter range include:

Hunter 28.5

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Marlow-Hunter 31

  • By Herb McCormick
  • Updated: March 16, 2016

Marlow Hunter 31

Once upon a time, I owned a J/30. As a racer/cruiser introduced in 1979, it lacked many cruising amenities, even for its era, but for a 30-footer it was plenty beamy (over 11 feet), and I always considered it a not-insubstantial vessel. Times change, of course, particularly with yacht designs, a point that was driven home as I stepped aboard the Marlow-­Hunter 31 last fall. Thinking back on my cherished J boat, I had to smile. Though roughly a foot shorter than the latest offering from the well-­established Florida builder, figuratively speaking, my old girl would have fit in this new 31-footer’s hip pocket. How was it even possible?

Well, the short answer is a quick summation of many of the characteristics shared by lots of contemporary production cruisers. Designers Glenn Henderson (a longtime Hunter hand) and David Marlow (a veteran powerboat builder who purchased the company three years ago) have incorporated a trendy hard chine just below the waterline and used it to maximize the dimensions and interior volume. Long waterline? Check. Extended topsides? Check. Max beam (almost 12 feet!) carried well aft? Check.

Indeed, the Marlow-Hunter 31 is a thoroughly ­modern pocket cruiser that also includes many familiar Hunter features, including a B&R rig with swept-back spreaders that eliminate the backstay. You’re not finding that on any imports. But when you start to scratch the surface, it’s also abundantly clear that there’s some serious innovation happening here, particularly in the methods and materials used to piece the boat together. We tested the M-H 31 on Chesapeake Bay during last fall’s Boat of the Year trials, and got totally skunked on breeze: zero, nothing, nada. It happens. But while a couple of the judges and I vainly tried to put the boat through its paces, David Marlow and the third member of our panel, systems expert Ed Sherman of the American Boat and Yacht Council, disappeared below, two salty dogs lost in private banter. Whatever were they discussing? Later, during deliberations, Sherman spilled the beans. “We had a fascinating conversation,” he said. “He’s a man on a mission who really wants to reinvent the Hunter brand. Part of the way he’s doing that is to take a hard look at long-term durability while trying to build a product that’s easier for his factory workers to assemble. He’s invested a huge amount of time and R & D in developing a database of what works and what doesn’t. It blew me away.

“Most of his experience is in the powerboat sector, but he has a broad nautical background, so he’s got some knowledge of ­hydrodynamics, aerodynamics and structural build,” he continued. “It’s evident in the hull layup, for instance, with the use of Kevlar forward to increase impact resistance. They’ve made some phenomenal decisions in how to address cores, where they’re going to be applied, and the type of fiberglass they use in the overall laminate. It’s pretty amazing, and it was impressive to talk to him about it.”

There’s the overview on the construction side. Judge Tim Murphy discussed specifics. “There’s definitely a new sheriff in town,” he said. “They’re doing a lot of things really right. There are no chopper guns in the layup shop anymore. Now they’re using biaxial cloth, and it’s engineered so the stress is carried in the right direction. They’re also using vinylester resin, which will really work against osmosis. Below the waterline, the boat is solid fiberglass, but in the topsides and deck they’ve eliminated balsa core and replaced it with Nida-Core, a honeycomb panel that’s lighter and stiffer. All good things.”

Marlow Hunter 31

So, yes, a new day has dawned at Marlow-Hunter, especially on the manufacturing front. What about execution? The judges loved some items and questioned a few others, starting all the way aft, with the hatch in the transom opening into a dedicated storage locker for surfboards or kayaks. Let’s put it this way: Holes in boats that may allow the ingress of water make the judges very nervous.

Topsides, the centerpiece of the design is the expansive, beam-to-beam cockpit, which eschews traditional coamings to create the widest possible space. The coolest part, everyone agreed, was the nifty articulating Lewmar pedestal and steering wheel, operated with a foot pedal to swing from side to side so the helmsman can steer in comfort from either a windward or leeward position. (The wheel spokes also fold inward to permit easy access to the drop-down transom.) Despite the beam, with this arrangement, there’s no need for twin wheels.

As with previous ­Hunters, the traveler for the B&R mainsail is stationed atop a prominent arch, which also houses speakers, LED lights, a bimini and one end of the double-ended main sheet (the other is led to the cabin top). Over the years, I’ve sailed many Hunters with this setup, and it’s functional, though it does take some getting used to. (It’s tough to gauge where the traveler is positioned.) Judge Alvah Simon isn’t a fan, primarily because the arch necessitates a high gooseneck for the boom to clear it; this elevates the sail plan, and power in the B&R rig is really derived from the mainsail. Though our test boat was equipped with an optional in-mast furling main, Simon recommends the standard, traditional, fully battened one.

One last thing: Some members of our team, perhaps less nimble than they once were, wondered if it would be difficult getting into or out of the cockpit on a steep heel. (There is a step in the coachroof leading forward, but one of our judges initially mistook it for a seat.) With calm conditions, we didn’t get the chance to try.

Down below, the layout is spacious. There is a large head, a straight-line galley and roomy berths in the ends of the boat. Each is a bit of a trade-off. The forward cabin has great headroom but a slightly smaller V-berth. The aft bed, athwartships below the cockpit, is huge but in a more enclosed space. All in all, for well under $200,000, the Marlow-Hunter 31 is a whole lot of boat in a very manageable package. As for the company itself, we’re talking equal parts revolutionary and evolutionary.

Marlow Hunter 31

LOA: 32’4″ LWL: 28’9″ Beam: 11’10” Draft (shoal / deep): 4’5″ / 5’5″ Sail Area: 581 ft 2 Ballast (shoal / deep): 3,525/3,379 lb. Displacement (shoal / deep): 11,854/12,000 lb. Ballast/Displacement: 0.28 Displacement/Length: 205 Sail Area/ Displacement: 17.7 Water: 50 gal. Fuel: 21 gal. Holding: 20 gal. Hast Height (Standard): 46’7″ Engine: 29 hp Yanmar (saildrive) Designers: Glenn Henderson/David Marlow Price: $160,000

Marlow-Hunter LLC 386-462-3629 www.marlow-hunter.com

Herb McCormick is CW’s executive editor.

  • More: 2011+ , 31 - 40 ft , Coastal Cruising , marlow-hunter , monohull , sailboat review , Sailboats
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Hunter Channel 31: A sporty, solidly built cruiser

David Harding

  • David Harding
  • February 3, 2022

A solidly built cruiser with a sporty edge and twin-keel option, Hunter’s Channel 31 has been impressing since her launch 22 years ago. David Harding sails one to find out why

One of the few Channel 31s moulded with blue gelcoat, Freya has been given additional vinyl styling at the bow. Credit: David Harding

One of the few Channel 31s moulded with blue gelcoat, Freya has been given additional vinyl styling at the bow. Credit: David Harding

Product Overview

Hunter channel 31, manufacturer:.

Brand loyalty is often strong among boat owners. If you find a boat you like, there’s a good chance that, when you come to move up or down, you will buy another one from the same builder. In Kevin and Maggie Cullimore’s case, it was moving up to the Hunter Channel 31.

Their first family cruising boat was a Hunter Ranger 245, which they bought in kit form at the London Boat Show in 1998.

Kevin fitted it out in the space of a few months and they sailed it for five years before two growing children dictated that a bigger boat was in order.

They were fortunate enough to find a Hunter Ranger 27 that had hardly been used.

Like Kevin, the owner had built it from a kit. Then he found out that his family actively disliked sailing, so it had to go. Kevin re-built much of the interior and it became his family’s boat for several years.

They cruised extensively, crossing to the Channel Islands on occasions, and were more than happy with their second Hunter.

A self-tacking jib came as standard on the Hunter Channel 31. Credit: David Harding

A self-tacking jib came as standard on the Hunter Channel 31. Credit: David Harding

No matter how settled you think you might be, however, life has a way of making you reconsider – and that’s exactly what happened to Kevin and Maggie.

On a visit to the East Coast one day, they stumbled across a Hunter Channel 31 bearing a ‘for sale’ sign.

‘We hadn’t been planning to buy a bigger boat’, says Kevin. ‘I had always wanted a 31 but didn’t think I could afford one. Still, seeing this one, we decided to have a look anyway.’

As chance would have it, they learned from the broker that the owner of the 31 was looking to move to a smaller Hunter.

So Kevin sent all the photos of his 27 – the fact that he had fitted a TV in the saloon proved to be a major selling point – and the 31’s owner visited Poole to have a look.

A deal was done, the new owner of the 27 sailed it back to the East Coast and Kevin sailed his new 31 from Woodbridge home to Poole.

Kevin Cullimore has equipped Freya for self-sufficient, short-handed cruising. Credit: David Harding

Kevin Cullimore has equipped Freya for self-sufficient, short-handed cruising. Credit: David Harding

That was in 2013, since when he – usually with Maggie, sometimes solo or with friends – has continued to cruise Freya widely.

France and the Isles of Scilly have been destinations on longer trips, in between which Freya has often been seen in the Solent and the West Country.

It’s all a far cry from Kevin’s early trial-and-error adventures with his Eclipse that he trailed to the Mediterranean and sailed to the Balearics.

Getting Freya to the condition she’s in now has been an ongoing process.

Hunter Channel 31 Plusher than on earlier Hunters, the interior provides plenty of stowage, handholds and bracing points. Credit: David Harding

Plusher than on earlier Hunters, the interior provides plenty of stowage, handholds and bracing points. Credit: David Harding

When, like Kevin, you’re of a practical disposition, you know what you want to do to your boat and you get on and do it.

This has involved everything from modifications to deck hardware to building new joinery down below and fitting a stern gantry to support solar panels , aerials and a radar.

The process of fitting out and making changes to his smaller boats is largely what encouraged Kevin to stick with Hunters when the time came to move up.

Hunter Channel 31 A stern gantry provides a mounting point for solar panels, aerials and the radar. Credit: David Harding

A stern gantry provides a mounting point for solar panels, aerials and the radar. Credit: David Harding

As he told me: ‘Having had two previous Hunters I was pretty impressed with the way they were built. I’ve drilled through quite a lot of them and found them well made. And no other twin-keeler really compares with them.’

His 245 and 27 were both twin-keelers, as is the Hunter Channel 31.

In places like the Channel Islands and the Isles of Scilly it can open up a lot of options to be able to dry out, and Kevin doesn’t consider it a significant sacrifice in performance terms to sail a twin-keeler.

The difference between the sailing ability of fins and twins is undoubtedly less with the Hunters than with many earlier generations of cruising yachts.

Hunter Channel 31: Boarding gates weren’t fitted originally but have made a big difference. Credit: David Harding

Boarding gates weren’t fitted originally but have made a big difference. Credit: David Harding

David Thomas’s designs earned the designer and builder a reputation for creating boats with twin keels (or twin fins, as they liked to call them) that sailed remarkably well.

The  Hunter Channel 31 and the earlier 32 (which became the 323) were among the larger boats you could buy in twin-keel form, along with some of the Westerlys, Moodys and Sadlers.

The Hunter, however, was distinctly more sporty in nature than most of the alternatives. She was also sportier than most of the earlier Hunters, excepting those conceived as One Designs such as the Impala, Formula One, 707 and Van de Stadt’s HB 31.

David Thomas was conscious that he had probably pushed the performance aspects of the design as far as Hunter would accept, and was half expecting to be asked to reduce the size of the mainsail for the twin-keeler at least.

His design was substantially heavier than many of the Hunter’s Continental competitors: he wanted her to have a good ballast ratio for stiffness, and that in turn called for generous displacement to support the extra weight in the keel(s).

As he told me at the time: ‘You can have the displacement as long as there’s enough sail area to go with it. A cruising boat with a miserable rig is a miserable compromise. So why not have a big rig? It’s what a cruising boat needs. That way you can have good light-weather performance in a heavyish boat.’

In essence it’s the same philosophy that Stephen Jones applied to the Sadler 290 – another powerful twin-keeler that’s heavier than a typical modern cruiser of similar length, yet a good deal faster too.

Hunter Channel 31: Originally the mainsheet was taken to a strong-point on the cockpit sole, but Kevin has moved it forward to the coachroof. Credit: David Harding

Originally the mainsheet was taken to a strong-point on the cockpit sole, but Kevin has moved it forward to the coachroof. Credit: David Harding

By the standards of the day (after a year’s delay, she was launched in 2000), the Hunter Channel 31 has a broad stern, which in turn called for a fuller entry than on many of Thomas’s earlier designs.

It all added up to a boat with a potent performance potential, as I learned on speaking to Thomas about the design and sailing with him on a breezy day in the spring of 2000.

‘It’s right down the middle between a club racer/One Design and a cruiser you can sail anywhere,’ he said. ‘It’s an offshore cruising yacht that will look after the crew.’

Choosing the right compromise

With the standard self-tacking jib, the option of twin keels and a few other concessions towards cruising, the 31 proved popular as a fast cruiser.

Nonetheless, with its slippery shape and relatively narrow waterline, the hull offered potential that Hunter had planned to make the most of with the introduction of a souped-up derivative to be known as the 303.

It was due to have a taller, double-spreader rig with inboard rigging to allow an overlapping genoa, balanced by a deeper fin keel in lead. In the event, the 303 was never developed and few 31s have been raced seriously enough to show what they’re capable of.

The boat I tested back in 2000 was a fin-keeler although, rather incongruously, it was fitted with a fixed two-bladed propeller that caused turbulence over the rudder and would have knocked a good deal off our speed.

Hunter Channel 31: The cockpit is narrow enough for leg-bracing between the seats, leaving comfortable coamings and a wide side deck. Credit: David Harding

The cockpit is narrow enough for leg-bracing between the seats, leaving comfortable coamings and a wide side deck. Credit: David Harding

On the whole I was impressed by the performance in a gusty 15-25 knots of breeze: under full main (with just the flattening reef pulled in) and self-tacker we clocked 5.5 knots upwind with the boat proving to be nicely balanced.

She stiffened up markedly at around 15° of heel, spun on a sixpence when asked to and exhibited few vices. Downwind we clocked 8.5 knots in a squall, provided I could keep her going in a straight line.

Most Hunter Channel 31s have the self-tacking jib that came as standard, but a minimal-overlap headsail can be used. Credit: David Harding

Most Hunter Channel 31s have the self-tacking jib that came as standard, but a minimal-overlap headsail can be used. Credit: David Harding

I couldn’t do that all the time because the rudder would lose grip unless we were almost dead downwind.

As soon as the wind came on to the quarter, she rounded up: the large mainsail combined with the generous sweep-back on the spreaders generated more power from the leech than the rudder was able to cope with: it was a choice of run or round up.

Hunter used the rudder from the HB 31 on both the 32/323 and the 31. I had already sailed the 323 in breezy conditions and found no issues.

Perhaps because of the broader stern and the more powerful mainsail, the rudder – to my mind at least – didn’t work as well on the Hunter Channel 31.

Unlike the demonstrator I sailed, with its fin keel and fixed prop, Kevin’s boat has twin keels and a Brunton Autoprop.

He had an Autoprop on the 27 and, amongst other things, likes the extra knot or knot-and-a-half it provides even on tick-over when he’s motor-sailing. It was one of the first additions he made to the 31.

We also had much less wind than on my earlier sail: a gentle 8-10 knots most of the time.

Since we had to cope with a few late-season whiskers below the waterline, we were never going to break any speed records but the whiskers were at least partially offset by Kevin’s new sails.

For downwind sailing he uses a cruising chute, and two years ago added the cruising equivalent of a Code 0.

He finds this particularly useful, as do many owners of boats with self-tacking jibs. On one memorable occasion, he flew it all the way from Guernsey to Dartmouth.

The Hunter Channel 31 is among the relatively small number of performance cruisers in this size range available with twin keels. Credit: David Harding

The Hunter Channel 31 is among the relatively small number of performance cruisers in this size range available with twin keels. Credit: David Harding

‘We had one of the most beautiful sails with the Code 0. We put it up and didn’t touch it all day, making 5.5 to 6 knots on a flat sea, in glorious sunshine and surrounded by dolphins.’

On the day of our sail, it nudged us along at up to 6.8 knots with the wind on the beam.

Even in these lighter conditions I was reminded why I had reservations about the rudder, the blade needing a little more balance to my mind and stalling occasionally if asked to do too much out of the ordinary.

That said, a rudder’s feel is a very subjective issue, and one on which I had lengthy conversations with David Thomas.

Verdict on the Hunter Channel 31

It’s easy to see why the Hunter Channel 31 hits the spot for many cruising sailors who enjoy sailing a boat that looks after them and really does sail.

She combines performance and robustness with a much more stylish arrangement below decks than found on earlier Hunters.

That’s because Ken Freivokh was commissioned to design the interiors on the later models.

He transformed them from basic and functional to still-functional yet infinitely more appealing.

A Hunter Channel 31 dried out on the Isles of Scilly

Freya demonstrating the benefits of twin keels, dried out on Bryher in the Isles of Scilly. Credit: Kevin Cullimore

Structurally, Hunter kept things simple with solid laminates and a single interior moulding forming the companionway, the engine tray and bearers, the heads and the base of the galley – ‘all the messy bits’, as Hunter put it.

Everything else was in timber and bonded to the outer hull.

On Kevin’s boat, the joinery is in cherry but there’s much more of it than on a standard boat.

Hunter Channel 31 A wet locker lives abaft the heads, the inside of the door providing handy tool stowage. Credit: David Harding

A wet locker lives abaft the heads, the inside of the door providing handy tool stowage. Credit: David Harding

Kevin has added lockers each side in the saloon above the back-rests where originally there were simply fiddled shelves.

He has blended them in so well that you would have no idea they weren’t original, and has done the same in the aft cabin.

He has even fitted several small drawers and made sure that not a cubic inch is wasted.

The time involved for a yard to do something like this would make it prohibitively expensive, but Kevin’s work shows what you can achieve if you have the skill and are prepared to devote the time to it.

‘I like messing around with woodwork’, he says.

Since he’s also more than adept with electrics, he has fitted three solar panels on the stern gantry – a total of 200 watts that will generate 67 amps on a sunny day.

Having owned Freya since 2013, Kevin has spent nearly 10 years refining her to create the cruising boat he has always wanted.

‘I don’t think we will ever change boats now,’ he says. ‘I’ve got this up to where it’s got to be, and if I bought another one I would have to start all over again. I’ve been through all that before.’

When you have a capable and well-sorted boat like this that will take you anywhere quickly and comfortably, dry out upright when you get there and look after you whatever the weather, why would you want to change?

Expert Opinion on the Hunter Channel 31

Nick Vass B,Sc B,Ed HND FRINA MCMS DipMarSur YS, marine surveyor www.omega-yachtservices.co.uk

The first thing that I notice when surveying British Hunter yachts is the spacious and airy interiors and the Channel 31 is the best of the lot, having been designed by Ken Freivokh, who was responsible for the stylish later Westerly Regatta interiors.

The 31 has a particularly large aft cabin. These are underrated yachts that suffered a kit boat stigma let down by some poor home finishing.

With the tiller mounted well aft and the mainsheet moved to the coachroof, there’s plenty of clear space in the cockpit. Credit: David Harding

With the tiller mounted well aft and the mainsheet moved to the coachroof, there’s plenty of clear space in the cockpit. Credit: David Harding

If you do buy a home-completed version, interior trim can easily be put straight, and the factory finished boats were well made and so easily comparable to the Sadler 290, Westerly Regatta 310 and Moody 31MkII.

A joy to survey, and to maintain, as access to critical items such as seacocks, stern gland, tanks and keel bolts is so easy.

Keel bolts are substantial and don’t tend to give trouble and Hunters don’t tend to get osmosis.

Hunter rudders were of a strange resin construction over a steel frame without a GRP shell. I have found several where the steelwork rusts but this has not led to failure and at least they don’t blister or come apart.

The Hunter Channel 31 was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the 32 which had replaced the Horizon 32.

However, the 31 was designed as a lighter faster cruiser/racer and came as a One Design racing version called the 303 which had a deep lead fin keel.

The Hunter Channel 31 was offered with fin or twin keels. Yanmar 2GM20 engines are reliable and there are plenty around.

Ben Sutcliffe-Davies, marine surveyor and full member of the Yacht Brokers Designers & Surveyors Association (YDSA) www.bensutcliffemarine.co.uk

Like all of David Thomas’s Hunter boats, the design of the Hunter Channel 31 concentrated on structure and build; the use of woven rovings over normal chop strand hold testament to the longevity and strength of these craft, which do hold their value well.

At the time of build, Hunters were certainly not the cheapest boats available for their size.

A common issue I’ve had when surveying these vessels is the moulding arrangement for the tiller area. It can suffer from wear and some light stress.

Some of the moulding returns have air voids in them from build, as woven rovings are not as easy to tuck into tight corners.

Outboard rigging leaves the side decks clear. A moulded upstand along the gunwale takes the place of an aluminium toerail. Credit: David Harding

Outboard rigging leaves the side decks clear. A moulded upstand along the gunwale takes the place of an aluminium toerail. Credit: David Harding

I have seen issues where owners have added extra batteries but have not thought through the right location for them.

Engine maintenance is also sometimes lacking due to the tight access. Many have the deep sea shaft seal so be aware of their age.

They usually need replacing after seven years so make sure you check them and the service record.

The decks are normally a foam core so don’t tend to suffer in the same way as yachts with a balsa core, but still be aware of deck fittings and stanchion points; check for overloading which can be common.

The Hunter Channel 31 has ring beams and yard staff can struggle to identify the correct points to locate cradle supports.

I have seen a few boats with small areas of delamination where the boat was incorrectly supported ashore.

Alternatives to the Hunter Channel 31 to consider

This exceptionally roomy and powerful twin-keeler is shorter than the Hunter but extraordinarily spacious and a remarkable performer too.

Her twin keels are cast in lead and bolted through moulded spacers to ensure a particularly low centre of gravity.

This enables her to carry a generous rig for good performance in light airs despite her relatively heavy displacement, while the slim profile of the keels contributes to a degree of hydrodynamic efficiency rarely seen in the twin-keeled world.

The Sadler 290 performs well in both light and heavy airs. Credit: David Harding

The Sadler 290 performs well in both light and heavy airs. Credit: David Harding

It’s also rare for boats under 9m (30ft) to achieve RCD Category A status, the Sadler’s AVS (angle of vanishing stability) of 140° being a major factor.

She was designed by Stephen Jones and launched three years after the Hunter by a Sadler company unrelated to earlier incarnations of Sadlers.

Jones gave her an exceptionally fine entry, with reserves of buoyancy forward being ensured by the high freeboard.

Her stern is even broader than the Hunter’s and her twin keels mounted further down the hull. This almost eliminates the banging and thudding that can afflict twin-keelers upwind in heavy weather, while minimising the additional drag caused by a root breaking the surface.

The large rig is of high-fractional configuration with an overlapping genoa to maintain drive in light airs.

The Sadler 290 A broad stern for powerful downwind performance. Credit: David Harding

A broad stern for powerful downwind performance. Credit: David Harding

On deck, the fine bow limits foredeck space but the wide sidedecks run all the way to the transom. The long cranked tiller is the dominant feature in the cockpit.

The layout below decks is unusual for a modern design in placing the heads between the saloon and forecabin, harking back to the arrangement widely seen in the 1970s and early 1980s.

That allows the galley to be moved well aft, alongside the companionway steps, where it’s right out of the way and not in any thoroughfares.

It’s probably one of the most practical and secure galleys on any boat under 40ft.

The detailing varies according to where the boats were fitted out: various yards were involved at different times.

Westerly Tempest

Westerly’s smaller sister to the Storm 33 was launched in 1987, overlapping with the popular and long-running Fulmar. All were designed by Ed Dubois.

Both the Storm and Fulmar had been conceived as cruiser-racers but, since few Storms were ever raced, Westerly realised that a change of emphasis was needed for the Tempest and aimed her firmly at the cruising market.

A fin keel was standard, though some owners reckoned it needed to be heavier and that the twin-keelers were stiffer.

The Westerly Tempest is slightly quirky but a good performer. Credit: David Harding

The Westerly Tempest is slightly quirky but a good performer. Credit: David Harding

Either way, the Tempest is no slouch. She has a gentle, easy motion combined with a respectable turn of speed for a relatively heavy boat.

Handling qualities are widely praised and the long cockpit, combined with a companionway that extends well forward, means you can almost reach the mast without having to go on deck.

The accommodation is unconventional and not for everyone. Westerly used the broad stern to fit-in twin double aft cabins, moving the heads to the bow abaft a large sail locker that opens into the heads via a door and to the deck via a hatch.

Continues below…

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With this locker in the bow and the aft cabins being well forward of the transom, the total cabin space is relatively short and the saloon too small for some tastes.

Cockpit stowage is also restricted by the stern cabins. A few boats were later built with a conventional forecabin.

From 1993, the Tempest evolved into the Regatta 310 with a re-styled interior designed by Ken Freivokh, but very few were sold.

Newer, lighter, sportier and more expensive than the British twin-keelers, the French-built RM is a boat that does things differently.

Plywood is used for the hull because of its strength, light weight and durability among other qualities.

The deck and coachroof are moulded, largely because plywood would give a very angular finish.

The RM 890 is light and fast with a plywood hull. Credit: David Harding

The RM 890 is light and fast with a plywood hull. Credit: David Harding

Everything about the RM 890 is geared around ruggedness, sailing ability and functionality.

She comes with a choice of bulbed, high aspect-ratio twin keels paired with a single rudder, or a deep T-bulb fin with twin rudders.

The keels are bolted through a steel frame inside the hull. Rigging arrangements can be varied, but the 890 typically carries a staysail set on a forestay secured to the anchor well bulkhead.

A genoa on a stemhead-mounted outer forestay can simply be rolled away rather than reefed when the wind picks up.

Like Westerly’s Tempest, the RM has a mainsheet traveller across the stern.

The tiller places the helmsman forward and close to the headsail winches for easy singlehanded sailing . Below decks the finish is painted plywood.

Privacy isn’t a priority – a few curtains are the order of the day – but the RM’s famous utility room to starboard, where many boats would fit another aft cabin, tells you exactly where the priorities lie.

A large forward-facing window gives an excellent view out. Just mind your footing on deck.

Sailing performance is hard to fault and the handling crisp and responsive.

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The Hunter 31 is a 31.33ft b&r designed by Cortland Steck and built in fiberglass by Hunter Marine (USA) between 1983 and 1987.

The Hunter 31 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is originally very small. There is a very short water supply range.

Hunter 31 sailboat under sail

Hunter 31 for sale elsewhere on the web:

hunter 31 sailboat

Main features

Model Hunter 31
Length 31.33 ft
Beam 10.92 ft
Draft 5.30 ft
Country United states (North America)
Estimated price $ 0 ??

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hunter 31 sailboat

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Sail area / displ. 16.17
Ballast / displ. 41.24 %
Displ. / length 239.41
Comfort ratio 22.36
Capsize 2.05
Hull type Monohull fin keel with spade rudder
Construction Fiberglass
Waterline length 26.25 ft
Maximum draft 5.30 ft
Displacement 9700 lbs
Ballast 4000 lbs
Hull speed 6.87 knots

hunter 31 sailboat

We help you build your own hydraulic steering system - Lecomble & Schmitt

Rigging B&R
Sail area (100%) 458 sq.ft
Air draft 47.33 ft
Sail area fore 252 sq.ft
Sail area main 205.81 sq.ft
I 42 ft
J 12 ft
P 37.42 ft
E 11 ft
Nb engines 1
Total power 16 HP
Fuel capacity 18 gals

Accommodations

Water capacity 33 gals
Headroom 0 ft
Nb of cabins 0
Nb of berths 0
Nb heads 0

Builder data

Builder Hunter Marine (USA)
Designer Cortland Steck
First built 1983
Last built 1987
Number built 0 ??

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hunter 31 sailboat

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  • Sailboat Guide

Hunter 31-2

Hunter 31-2 is a 29 ′ 11 ″ / 9.1 m monohull sailboat designed by Hunter Design and built by Hunter Marine between 2006 and 2009.

Drawing of Hunter 31-2

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Deep keel version Draft: 5.5’/1.68 m Displacement: 8,390 lbs/3,806 kg Ballast: 2,456 lbs/1,114 kg AKA HUNTER 30 (2005).

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Building Lasting Relationships Through Quality and Precision

Our team of Precision Sails experts conducted extensive research on the web to gather information about the specific sailboat in question. We thoroughly scoured various online sources to compile relevant and accurate information for the boat owner. Our team carefully curated the information to ensure that it would be helpful and informative for the user. We understand the importance of having a deep understanding of your boat’s features, and our goal is to provide comprehensive and reliable information that will enable boat owners to make informed decisions about their sailing experience. By sharing our expertise and knowledge, we hope to empower our customers to get the most out of their sailing adventures.

Hunter-31-2008-Sailboat

All About Your Hunter 31

Rig specifications.

These are the specifications provided by the designers, but even from the factory, these boats may not be identical. The reason for this is that the sail industry often contracts manufacturing to different sources in order to achieve economies of scale. What this means is – your Hunter 31 may be more unique than you initially thought.

It’s important to note that boats are also frequently customized, so if you suspect that work has been done on yours, it’s best to take your own measurements. When ordering a sail, we will advise you if using the manufacturer’s specifications is appropriate, or if we require you to complete our own measurement forms.

I: 42.00 ft / 12.80 m
J: 12.00 ft / 3.66 m
P: 37.42 ft / 11.41 m
E: 11.00 ft / 3.35 m

Hunter-31-Cabin

The Hunter 31 features a sloop rig. A sloop rig is a single-masted sailboat configuration with one head sail, typically a jib or a genoa, and a mainsail. This simple and efficient rigging setup is commonly found on a wide range of sailboats, including the Hunter 31, and offers excellent performance, ease of handling, and versatility in various wind conditions. The sail controls are strategically positioned within easy reach of the helmsman, which allows for quick adjustments to aid with switching wind conditions. Hunter also offered the option between a standard rig and a furling mast system, providing flexibility for different sailing styles and skill levels.

The design of the Hunter 31 is well-thought out and a testament to Hunter Marine’s dedication to performance and good looks. The well-balanced proportions and hull shape contribute to the boat’s performance capabilities, allowing the boat to slice through water with ease. Downstairs, you’ll be greeted by a spacious seating area and ample headroom. Large windows and hatches allow for natural light to flow in, which makes the interior feel more open. With lots of storage, you’ll never run out of room for equipment and personal items.

Hunter Marine was founded in the early 1970s and had a goal to create sailboats that not only excelled in performance, but also comfort and affordability. Released in 1983, the Hunter 31, designed by Cortland Steck, quickly gained popularity for its sleek design, spacious interior and impressive sailing capabilities. This is a boat that caught the attention of both experienced sailors and newcomers. Over the years, the Hunter 31 underwent several design modifications and feature enhancements, adapting to the evolving needs and preferences of sailors. Today, the Hunter 31 continues to be a sought-after sailboat, cherished for its excellent craftsmanship and performance.

Hunter-310-Spinnaker

Performance

The performance of the Hunter 31 is unparalleled, combining speed with stability to provide a safe yet exhilarating experience. The Hunter 31 brings both a balanced rudder and a deep, bulb keel to the table, which provide excellent stability, minimizing heel and boosting comfort, even in rough conditions. Furthermore, the Hunter 31’s performance is not limited to open water sailing. Its versatile design allows it to perform well in various sailing scenarios such as racing or coastal cruising.

From its sleek exterior to its thoughtfully laid-out interior, the Hunter 31 is a sailboat that catches eyes for all of the right reasons. The Hunter 31 excels in performance with its responsive handling and versatile rigging options. Its efficient hull design and sail plan deliver excellent speed and stability, allowing sailors to confidently navigate various wind conditions. The spacious cockpit provides lots of seating and excellent visibility. With ample storage and a spacious cabin, this boat ensures a comfortable voyage. By investing in the Hunter 31 you are guaranteeing comfortable and stress-free adventures.

Recommended Sails For Your Hunter 31

We would love to help you enhance your sailing experience on your Hunter 31. That’s why we have put together a list of expertly curated sail recommendations just for you. You can find more information about each sail and what makes our sails stand out by following the links to our education page.

You need a mainsail designed to give you the greatest mileage out of your vessel. Precision Sails’ custom designed mainsails come with all the standard options needed to get sailing right away, and custom options to optimize handling, performance, and shape.

Jibs, genoas, yankee cut, staysails, or working jibs, we do it all. No matter what headsail you need for you sailboat, Precision Sails’ team of sail designers will work with you to ensure your new head sail fits and performs for you. Our headsails come complete with all standard options required for the best performance and durability. Learn more about our available headsail options and customization here.

Downwind and Light Wind Sails

Sail downwind easily with your choice of our downwind and light wind sail options. We custom design and tailor every sail for your needs. Explore our symmetrical or asymmetrical spinnakers and code zeros, including what options are available for each.

Want to Take Your Hunter 31 to the Next Level of Performance?

Then, it’s time to consider the sails you’re using. That’s why we offer custom-fit sails designed to optimize the performance of your Hunter 31. Our team of experts takes pride in using only the best materials and cutting-edge technology to ensure that our sails are of the highest quality.

Hunter-31-Headsail-Design

With our custom-fit sails, you can expect maximum speed, power, and maneuverability on the water. A true game changer – a paired combination of head sails and mainsails. When two sails are designed in tandem we can optimize their performance to work together. The best part? We keep your measurements and designs on file, so you can develop your sail inventory over time, we’ll always be ready to pick up where we left off in your sail customization journey.

Leopard-Catamaran-Downwind-Sails

Reliability and Durability

Our sails don’t just improve your boat’s performance – they also provide you with peace of mind during your extended sailing journeys. Our sails are not like off-the-shelf options that have a short lifespan. Instead, we can tailor the design of the sails to withstand the specific demands of your boat, ensuring their durability and reliability.

Hunter-31-Sail-Design

Providing Unparalleled Service

And, we’re not just about high-quality sails. Our team is dedicated to providing you with the best service possible. From helping you take accurate measurements to delivering your custom sails, we’re here to make sure you’re satisfied with your experience.

Trust us to exceed your expectations and take your sailing experience to the next level.

“ Covid took over the world and I had the sails shipped to a relative in the US. My boat is in the US so I couldn’t get to it. I asked Precision Sails if they would honor their warranty until I can install them: they said absolutely. Summer 2022: we were finally allowed to cross the border. The genoa was fine but the main sail was too thick to furl in the mast, the reinforced tack and hoist point were the culprits. So we manage to find a sail maker in Canada to modify the main. Precision Sails paid everything, transport and modifications to achieve the final result. They hold their word no matter what and plus if the modified sail wouldn’t fit again they would have made another one at no charge. WOW! Thank you Precision Sails! -Luc F (BBB)
“ I have had two sails made by Precision Sails in the last 12 months. Both have exceeded my expectations. The fit to the boat and the performance of the sails are exceptional. The sail designer worked with me to make sure the resulting sail fit my objectives. Precision Sails has excellent documentation and videos to assure that your measurements are accurate. The sails are first rate and the price was very competitive. I am a very happy repeat customer. -Terry Noreault (Facebook)
“ The staff were very helpful and responded promptly with a quote. The follow up was excellent and the new mainsail is well built and fits the boat perfectly. -Rick Clark (Facebook)
“ I just received my asymmetrical spinnaker, with sock and turtle bag, along with a new 135 Genoa. The entire process was simple and both sales and the design team were in regular contact if there were any questions. The customer portal was easy to use and lets you keep track of where in the process your sails are. Great sails, great service -Graham Edwards (Facebook)
“ Just received our Mainsail for our Hunter 41 with an in mast furling main. Installed perfectly and the quality is amazing. Can’t wait to get out into big water and shake it out. Outstanding customer service. -Karl Messer (Facebook)
“ Great new genoa for my Beneteau 46 – looks and performs great. Thanks for making it such an easy design, ordering, and delivery process. -Jim MacDonald (Facebook)
“ Very responsive, excellent quality, very fair prices. When they were not happy with the graphic on the first sail Ron called to let me know and they sent me a second sail at no charge. Highly recommended! -Gerry Beltgens (facebook)
“ Great price and a quick turnaround got me to buy. A well built sail that works in light and heavy winds will bring me back. -Edmond Dee (Facebook)
“ I sail out of Whitby Ontario. No one local wanted to deal with me because I am not value for money based on the size of my sailboat. I drop a request to Precision via the web and “boom”, instant response followed by ZERO pressure initial consultation! Signed up for three easy payments and that was that! During process, the team helps you all the way with measurements and good follow up questions. BTW my Kirby 25 slips effortlessly through the water with these new sails. Also, lots of positive comments on the boom cover when sitting at the dock! -John Thompson (Google)
“ Wow, just Wow. I knew the sails on my Hunter 27 where a little old and stretched, but I didn’t’ realize what a difference new sails could make. The boat points better than it ever has and is not nearly as sluggish as it was. I enjoyed the entire process of sail making with Precision Sails. I enjoy watching a lot of You Tube sailors and many of them promote Precision Sails. I also tend to side with the cruising rather than racing lifestyle. After reviews and recommendations, I decided on Precision. I really enjoyed working with the Design Team on my sails. Can’t wait to go sailing again. Thank you Precision sails for making my old boat new again. -Jonathan Pilgrim (Google)
“ We love the design, quality, construction, and performance of our new 95% furling jib from Precision Sails. The sail works well with our staysail and performs better than expected on all points of sail including poled out dead down wind. The new 95% jib does not get as overpowered as our old 135% Genoa and it is easier to tack with the staysail deployed. The design team made the process of getting accurate dimensions easy, took the time to understand our requirements, and was a pleasure to deal with. I will definitely do business with Precision again! -Charles Clark (Google)
“ Quality throughout the whole process… starting with quotation, options and cloth alternatives. Quick delivery time and the product is very good quality. I am very pleased to carry my Precision sails on my boat. I recommend them 100%! -Marcos D.
“ Got everything trimmed right today. Out sailing now. It’s perfect. I love the sail it’s perfect it’s exactly what I wanted thank you so much. -Elizabeth H.
“ I just received the 2nd custom-made sail I’ve ordered through Precision Sails. The process for providing measurement information and custom images is very clearly laid out in the forms on their website, in addition to several instructional YouTube videos. The results turned out beautifully, just as I had pictured it for both sails! -Michael Shafer (Google)
“ Precision Sails was great! They built our spinnaker for our Hunter 260, and it is great, at a good price. I will be getting other sails from Precision when we need to replace them on our new (to us) Lagoon 410. -Scott Huckerby (Google)
“ Just received my new mainsail from Precision Sail Loft and am over the moon about it. Darryl walked me through all my options and gave great advice. The measurement form is foolproof. They keep you updated with the status of your order every step of the way. I can recommend them highly enough. -Henry Gomez (Google)
“ This summer was our first experience buying a new sail for our Catalina 28MkII, we also race-crew a friend’s C&C 27 with newer Precision main and Genoa. Several other boats at our club have Precision sails and after couple of quotes from notable lofts narrowed it down to Precision to replace our #2 up front. We were late ordering in mid-July when COVID19 was wrecking everyone’s delivery schedule yet we had our new sail within 5 weeks, which seems a minor miracle. Bottom line, love the sail (excellent design/fit, quality), easy to work with these folks despite the time/distance to Ottawa, cutting edge tech engagement which is a confidence builder, and they seem to be getting it done for their clients despite the present challenges. So we just ordered a new main from Precision for spring delivery. -Dale Caseley (Google)
“ I was introduced to Precision Sails through Sailing Yacht Ruby Rose on You Tube. I decided to try the online experience myself. I provided the measurements and had good conversations with the sales team and with the sail designer. The new Genoa arrived in great condition and was a perfect fit! Couldn’t be happier!! -Brad Hamrlik (Google)
“ This summer I purchased a main and a Genoa for my Dufour 385 from Precision. The sails arrived in the time frame promised and fit perfectly. The quality appears to be excellent. I highly recommend Precision Sails. -John McCracken (Google)
“ Was extremely impressed with the ease of choosing and ordering a new mainsail for my Montgomery 17. I’m always a little hesitant when giving sensitive info on-line… as this transaction was done with a lot of research…I actually paid them (Precision) a visit in Victoria, B.C. (yes they do exist). We worked out the kinks via e-mails, and now can enjoy a good laugh over “the incident”…which they took care of in a very professional manner!…very happy with the fit (perfect!), function and quality of my new sail! Thanks guys p.s. great price too!! -Alan Cade (Google)
“ Ordered sails for my last boat and was very happy, now I’m ordering for my new boat. Great and friendly service. -Gord Fulcher (Google)
“ Great customer service after receiving a quote for a new head sail. Even after explaining we may not be in the market for one right now, the sales rep I spoke with took 10 minutes to chat with me about other options and gave me recommendations for sail makers that could help us keep costs down and work with our damaged head sail. So much appreciation for this kind of service and honesty, will be back when the current head sail fails us and we are ready for a brand new one!!! -Krista Scholl (Google)
“ The whole team at Precision Sails was fantastic from start to finish. We’ve had a laminate main and genoa made so far and have a spinnaker on the way. They listened carefully to our needs and recommended a great sail cloth. We couldn’t have gotten more bang for our buck! -Noah Regelous (Google)
“ What a great experience! These boats are our babies and it’s obvious Precision Sails loves sailing. They make it easy and low stress. I can’t wait to buy another sail. -Lane Roth (Google)
“ Our new sails performed flawlessly. Several of our crew were seasoned Annapolis sailors, who commented on the quality of the sails and of how they seemed to improve Godspeed’s performance. We were also impressed with your consult-measure-design process. Your sales persons were knowledgeable and helpful. As was the designer, who I spoke with several time. We had obtained quotes at the Annapolis Boat Show from North Sails and Quantum Sails — both were more expensive than your quote for equivalent quality and options.” -Randy Gillies
“ We received our spinnaker and launched it yesterday and I just wanted to let you know how pleased we are with it. The service we received from your company was exceptional and the quality of your product is second to none. We will certainly be return customers in the next few months to replace our main and jib sails and will recommend your company to all our sailing buddies. Once again-thank you.” -Daniel Jackson (Google)
“ Experts in design and customer service. Always kept me informed of the status of my sail. Sailing friends were very complimentary of the design and quality workmanship.” -Pete Klein (Facebook)
“ These guys stand behind their work and design. Top notch in customer service – their goal is to ensure you are happy. I recommend and will purchase from them again.” -Chris Eisenberg (Facebook)
“ we had good communication during the planning stages and the knowledgeable people at precision sails really got me fixed up good! The sails look and work fabulous! my boat sails better than it ever had! couldn’t be more pleased with the product AND the service!” -Fred Jelich (Facebook)
“ The whole staff at Precision Sails were great to work with, and very responsive to all my inquiries about measurements and design. My new main and head sail, made from the Challenge Warp Drive sailcloth, arrived earlier than promised, and fit perfectly. The workmanship is superb and the attention to detail is top notch. I would not hesitate to purchase sails from them again, and will be recommending them to my fellow sailors. Thank you, Precision Sails: 5 Stars!” -Richard Hendry (Google)
“ Precision Sails built a great mainsail. Everything was done as expected at a good price and a good turn around time. They were on top of each step and advised me accordingly. I will likely have them start on a head sail soon.” -David B. (Google)
“ Our new furling jib for a Corsair 27 Had to be specially designed due to the height of the furler, but this was accomplished quickly and in short order we had our sail which fits beautifully and has a great shape. It’s everything we could have wanted, high tech design, thoughtfully executed and affordable.” -Nancy Y. (Yelp)
“ Really impressed how much better the performance on my boat has been with a new mainsail from Precision. The process was great and appreciated the advice during the design stage for club racing configuration. -Carl Lingen (Facebook)
“ Precision sails delivered a high quality product at a very reasonable price. The sail they created is custom fit for my boat and the challenging conditions under which she will be used. -John M. (BBB)
“ My new warp drive tri-radial mainsail from Precision Sails exceeded my expectations. I would put their product against any of the big lofts. The quality control and attention to detail is exceptional. Fun group of sailors to work with. Highly recommended. -David Sestini (Google)
“ Followed advice of their design team for our Hunter Passage 42. Very happy with the increased low wind performance of our head sail. -Caleb Coggins (Google)

Request a Hunter 31 Quote

Looking to buy a new headsail or mainsail for your Hunter 31? Request a free quote from Precision Sails for a new custom sail. Our team will work with you to design the perfect sail for you.

Thanks for telling us a bit about yourself and your boat. Our team will send you a preliminary quote based on information we have gathered from sailors similar to you.

We will give you a call in order to narrow down the options on your quote and improve the accuracy. If you want us to call you at a specific time, feel free to schedule a time on our calendar!

Thanks for telling us a bit about yourself and your boat. Our team will reach out to offer some suggestions and get started on finding you the perfect sail!

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All Locked Up Storage

Hours updated 1 month ago

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We specialize in boat, RV and self storage.

We specialize in boat, RV and self storage.

Give us a call at 661-295-5914 to book an… read more

Walk-ins are welcome

Walk-ins are welcome

We'd love to see you. Come by for all your storage… read more

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FOR YOUR STORAGE NEEDS

FOR YOUR STORAGE NEEDS

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26 years in business

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Locally owned & operated

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Speaks Spanish

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Walk-ins welcome

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Offers Insurance

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J W.

“ The owners or workers are there 24/7 and keep a great watch on the property . ” in 7 reviews

Bob H.

“ Over the last twenty years, we've stored boats and trailers throughout Santa Clarita and All Locked Up had been the best. ” in 2 reviews

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“ Their facility is clean and neat - extremely well maintained and very secure. ” in 4 reviews

About the Business

We specialize in consistent, clean, and affordable storage to fit everything from your RV to the pictures and things you value most. We are a local business with competitive rates and customer service that's unmatched. If a well maintained, safe and secure place to store your valuables is what you're looking for. Let me welcome you to All Locked Up Storage. Please feel free to give us a call anytime for anymore questions. …

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32204 Castaic Rd

Castaic, CA 91384

Serving Castaic Area

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Thu, Jul 4, 2024

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Mon, Oct 14, 2024

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We have had storage units here off and on for the past 20yrs. they are by far the best. The staff are have always gone above and beyond whenever we have needed service or help. I highly recommend this storage facility.

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We recently rented a storage unit and Jay was awesome. He took his time with us and was very friendly and helpful. Our rate is $45 per month lower than the place we rented in Canyon Country and is guaranteed to not be increased for 2 years! The place is clean and well maintained so we are very happy all around with All Locked Up in Castaic!

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Really had a nice experience with this facility. Location and staff are great. Property is secure and I had to leave as I moved out of the area. Would recommend for sure.

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It's a great place to store your stuff and the best prices in the valley and the service is great

The service is great and it is 100 % clean and the price is will worth it and so if you need a great place and something to storage this is it

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Great service all the time i have been here for 5 years now i have my RV here and they also have a dumping station always safe with the cameras all around never any problems

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Last weekend my husband and I went to look for a spot for our toy hauler to be stored at. We were greeted by Jay who was very friendly and showed us the various spots that he had available. He showed us the spots he had and then gave us the prices. Overall the process, time and dedication that Jay has for his customers is noticed. I was able to notice that he looks out for the best interest in his customers. Thanks Jay for the smooth transition to All Locked Up Storage.

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The previous owners were amazing and they found a wonderful gentleman to take over. Always respectful, clean, safe, and have competitive pricing. He even treats my kids with respect and kindness. You can't get that everywhere.

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I have been with All locked up storage for over 7 years with multiple units and just got another one. They are truly a great storage complex and I trust them with my stuff

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I'm I the process of downsizing. It's been an emotional rollercoaster for me. I went in on 12/11 to sort, donate, toss what I could. Andrew answered all of my questions! He got a cart ready to me to haul some items from my storage unit to the dumpster. He never made me feel like I was imposing. He was friendly, knowledgeable & professional. Thank-you!

I've been storing my excess items here for a few years. I started sharing with my daughter. As my stash of stuff grew, I took over the unit. The transition was smooth. Office staff have been friendly and very responsive. I feel safe going in and out of my unit. My items are not in extreme heat which I love! I've checked other facilities and others are more $$ for less square footage.

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I've been at this place for over 10 years, management it's always been first class, highly recommended.

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COMMENTS

  1. Hunter 31 boats for sale

    Find Hunter 31 boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of Hunter boats to choose from.

  2. HUNTER 31

    Find detailed information about the HUNTER 31 sailboat, including dimensions, weight, rigging, sails, and performance. Compare with other sailboats and join the sailboat forum.

  3. Classic Plastic: Hunter 31

    The Hunter 31 is a comfortable coastal cruiser. "Classic Plastic" from our November 2010 issue. Hunter Marine introduced the Hunter 31 in 1983, and it remained in production for four years. My 1986 Hunter 31, which I named Aquarius, was 3 years old when I acquired it, and it had only been lightly used. I found it fun to sail.

  4. Hunter 31

    The Hunter 31 is an American sailboat, designed by Cortland Steck and first built in 1983. In 2006 the company introduced a new boat under the same Hunter 31 name, but it is commonly referred to as the Hunter 31-2 or Hunter 30/31 to differentiate it from this design. It is ...

  5. Hunter 31 boats for sale

    A sailboat built by Hunter, the 31 is a sloop vessel. Hunter 31 boats are typically used for overnight-cruising, sailing and watersports. Got a specific Hunter 31 in mind? There are currently 28 listings available on Boat Trader by both private sellers and professional boat dealers. The oldest boat was built in 1983 and the newest model is 2009.

  6. The Hunter 31 Sailboat Specs & Key Performance Indicators

    The Hunter 31 Sailboat: A Review. The Hunter 31 is a popular model from Hunter Marine, an American company that has been building quality sailboats since 1973. The Hunter 31 was first introduced in 1983 and was designed by Cortland Steck. It was produced until 1987, when it was replaced by the Hunter 33.5. In 2006, Hunter Marine launched a new ...

  7. Marlow-Hunter 31 Sailboat Review: Space to Sail

    By Rupert Holmes. November 10, 2015. The new Marlow-Hunter 31 is a cruising sailboat built to a high standard, offering an unusually large amount of space for its length—and with the benefit of a choice of shoal or deep-draft keel. A marked chine in the hull's after sections helps to improve stability and adds volume in this part of the boat.

  8. Hunter 31 boats for sale

    27. Contact. 833-258-3722. 1. Sort By. Filter Search. View a wide selection of Hunter 31 boats for sale in your area, explore detailed information & find your next boat on boats.com. #everythingboats.

  9. Sail Hunter 31 boats for sale

    Find Sail Hunter 31 boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of Hunter boats to choose from.

  10. Hunter 31 boats for sale in United States

    Find Hunter 31 boats for sale in United States. Offering the best selection of Hunter boats to choose from. ... 1986 Hunter 31. US$10,999. ↓ Price Drop. Sailboats Northeast | Littleton, Massachusetts. New Arrival; 1986 Hunter 31. US$21,000. The Shoreline Yacht Group | Wilmington, California.

  11. Marlow-Hunter 31 Sailboat Review

    The aft bed, athwartships below the cockpit, is huge but in a more enclosed space. All in all, for well under $200,000, the Marlow-Hunter 31 is a whole lot of boat in a very manageable package. As for the company itself, we're talking equal parts revolutionary and evolutionary. The main cabin is spacious for a 31-footer with ample headroom.

  12. Meet the Hunter 31 Sailboat

    Maximum efficiency and comfort has been built into the interior of the Hunter 31. The forward cabin is larger than those in most boats of this class, achieve...

  13. Hunter 31

    Hunter 31 is a 31′ 3″ / 9.6 m monohull sailboat designed by Cortland Steck and built by Hunter Marine between 1983 and 1987. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D: Displacement of the boat in pounds. LWL ...

  14. Hunter Channel 31: A sporty, solidly built cruiser

    The Hunter Channel 31 was introduced in 1999 as a replacement for the 32 which had replaced the Horizon 32. However, the 31 was designed as a lighter faster cruiser/racer and came as a One Design racing version called the 303 which had a deep lead fin keel. The Hunter Channel 31 was offered with fin or twin keels.

  15. Hunter 31-2

    The Hunter 31-2 is an American sailboat that was designed by the Hunter Design Team and first built in 2006.. The design was originally marketed by the manufacturer as the Hunter 30 and later as the Hunter 31, but is now usually referred to as the 31-2 or the 30/31 (2005), to differentiate it from the unrelated 1983 Hunter 31 design. It is also sometimes confused with the 2015 Marlow-Hunter 31.

  16. 1985 Hunter 31 "Wind Walker" Walkthrough

    "Wind Walker" is a unique starter boat with many options you wouldn't expect on a boat this size, like a radar, satellite antenna, life raft, outboard and mo...

  17. Hunter 31

    The Hunter 31 is a 31.33ft b&r designed by Cortland Steck and built in fiberglass by Hunter Marine (USA) between 1983 and 1987. The Hunter 31 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is ...

  18. Hunter 31-2

    Hunter 31-2 is a 29′ 11″ / 9.1 m monohull sailboat designed by Hunter Design and built by Hunter Marine between 2006 and 2009. Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. Sign in to save them permanently, access them on any device, and receive relevant alerts. ... Hunter 31-2 is a 29 ...

  19. The 31

    360 Marlow-Hunter 31 Virtual Tour » The Marlow-Hunter 31, which has a length overall of 32'4" and a beam of 11'10" will be a tough contender for any model in her size range that tries to compete with the volume below. One of her best features is the spacious cockpit that delivers a feel more like that of a larger boat. To allow maximum utility, we developed the tacking helm pedestal, where at ...

  20. HUNTER 30/31 (2005)

    Originally named the HUNTER 30, the name was changed to the HUNTER 31 during its production. Hull length: 29.98 ft / 9.13m Shoal keel: - Draft: 3.92 ft / 1.19m-Displacement: 8505 lbs / 3857.8 kg ... A sail area/displacement ratio below 16 would be considered under powered; 16 to 20 would indicate reasonably good performance;

  21. Hunter 31 Sails for Sale

    Sail Plan. The Hunter 31 features a sloop rig. A sloop rig is a single-masted sailboat configuration with one head sail, typically a jib or a genoa, and a mainsail. This simple and efficient rigging setup is commonly found on a wide range of sailboats, including the Hunter 31, and offers excellent performance, ease of handling, and versatility ...

  22. ALL LOCKED UP STORAGE

    30 reviews and 9 photos of ALL LOCKED UP STORAGE "WooHoo! This place is the BEST self storage facility in California :-) Seriously the Property Manager and his wife are AWESOME! Their prices are the BEST in town and you actually get to have the BEST "Dog the Bounty Hunter" impersonator as your property manager! No kidding. His name is K-Nine (aka Kevin) seriously the nicest people and a great ...

  23. CHANNEL 31 (HUNTER)

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  24. MARLOW-HUNTER 31

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5